French Pioneer receives Novozymes Prize – University of Copenhagen

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12 March 2015

French Pioneer receives Novozymes Prize

Prize

Newly appointed Adjunct Professor Bernard Henrissat, head of the Glycogenomics team in the AFMB lab (Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules de Biologiques, Marseilles, France), is to receive the first Novozymes Prize on 17 March 2015, at a ceremony, where the prize winner will give an introduction to his research.

Newly appointed Adjunct Professor Bernard Henrissat, head of the Glycogenomics team in the AFMB lab (Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules de Biologiques, Marseilles, France), is to receive the first Novozymes Prize on 17 March 2015, at a ceremony, where the prize winner will give an introduction to his research. In addition, and in celebration of the prize Professor Henrissat’s and the Foundation have arranged an international symposium within the recipient’s scientific field. 

Henrissat is a world-renowned expert in carbohydrate-active enzymes and the founder of the widely used CAZy-database (www.cazy.org). Bernard Henrissat serves on the scientific advisory board of the Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen and engages in extensive collaborations with academic and industry research environments in Denmark. “We congratulate Bernard on his achievements and on receiving one of the biggest prizes in Denmark,” says Ulla Wewer, Dean at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. 

Pioneering research

Bernard Henrissat will receive this inaugural prize for his pioneering research on characterizing and systematizing enzymes. As part of his innovative work so far, he has created a unique database of significant enzymes that can be used for improving biotechnological processes, including the production of biofuels, and to combat disease. The database is available to both science and industry and the sheer quantity of data makes the database a goldmine for researchers and companies throughout the world.

“The enzyme classification system in the database helps us analyse microbial genomes. This will enable us to discover potentially interesting enzymes that can help streamline the production of biofuel, for example. The database can also assist in locating the enzymes that are key in people’s gut flora and thereby hopefully help us understand and prevent the obesity epidemic currently sweeping parts of the world,” Bernard Henrissat states.  “I am extremely honoured and grateful to receive such a major prize. This will enable me to continue working intensively on my research, and I have many ideas on how to use the money,” he adds.

Contact:
Professor Henrik Clausen
Mobile: (+45)  20 14 55 37