Constant arguing increases premature death risk – University of Copenhagen

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09 May 2014

Constant arguing increases premature death risk

Healthy aging

People who frequently argue with family and friends, or worry too much about their loved ones, may have triple the risk of dying early in middle age, compared with those who are less argumentative suggests a new Danish study from Center for Healthy Aging.

"Having an argument every now and then is fine, but having it all the time seems dangerous," said study researcher Rikke Lund, an associate professor at the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen.

The researchers found that unemployed men in particular seemed most vulnerable to stresses caused by constant conflicts with friends or family.

The researchers found that unemployed men in particular seemed most vulnerable to stresses caused by constant conflicts with friends or family.

Data on 9,875 men and women aged between 36 and 52 was used to explore the relationship between stressful social relations and premature death. The researchers found that unemployed men in particular seemed most vulnerable to stresses caused by constant conflicts with friends or family.

Rikke Lund said worries and arguments were part of life. But added that people who were always or often involved in conflicts were at greatest risk, and could be helped. "Intervening in conflicts, particularly for those out of work, may help to curb premature deaths associated with social relationship stressors," she added.

Contact:

Rikke Lund
Mobile: +45 24 66 05 35