Young research talent from SUND is awarded Lundbeckfonden’s Talent Prize – University of Copenhagen

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26 October 2016

Young research talent from SUND is awarded Lundbeckfonden’s Talent Prize

Lundbeckfondens Talent Prize

This year, Lundbeckfonden’s personal merit award, also called the Talent Prize, is awarded to Doctor and PhD Student Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen from the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

The target group for Lundbeckfonden’s Talent Prize is particularly promising researchers under 30 years of age. The Prize is a personal merit award amounting to DKK 100,000. Leading scientists from Danish universities and other research institutions recommend candidates for consideration. The prize is awarded to 3-5 researchers who have presented particularly promising research on health and medical sciences. This year, the prize is awarded to Doctor and PhD Student Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen affiliated with the Section for Endocrinology at the Department of Biomedical Sciences and the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, where he works closely with Professor Jens Juul Holst. In addition, he also collaborates with Matthias Mann at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research.

“I’m very pleased and honoured to receive such recognition for the research we conduct in collaboration with doctors from the Danish hospitals and researchers from international research institutions, including the Max-Planck Institute in Munich and the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. It’s also a tremendous pat on the back, which motivates and provides drive,” says Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen.

"I’m very pleased and honoured to receive such recognition for the research we conduct in collaboration with doctors from the Danish hospitals and researchers from international research institutions, including the Max-Planck Institute in Munich and the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston

Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

New tools for diagnosing clinical diseases
Among other things, Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen’s research includes measuring and identifying proteins in the blood in order to understand the body’s physiology and to be able to examine the changes that occur during an illness. By examining how the proteins function in healthy individuals, in the long-term this will allow researchers to discover why they are malfunctioning in diseased individuals. The examinations re carried out on cells, animals and humans by way of measuring methods such as radioimmunoassay and by way of a technological approach called mass spectrometry

”Our work is basically all about understanding how the body’s sugar metabolism functions, and it’s my hope that our research will contribute to an understanding of at least one single bit in this huge puzzle. My long-term dream is succeeding in making our ‘protein profiling’ method, aided by the forces of ‘systems biology’, a tool that can be used in diagnosing clinical diseases,” says Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen.

"My long-term dream is succeeding in making our ‘protein profiling’ method, aided by the forces of ‘systems biology’, a tool that can be used in diagnosing clinical diseases

Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

Ambitious scientist with an impressive CV
Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen has previously received the Ministry of Higher Education and Science’s prestigious Elite-Forsk Travel Stipend, which is awarded to particularly talented PhD students. Already as a student of medicine, he showed an interest in combining basic research and medical science, and from a very young age, he has managed to forge unique international research relations. He has contributed to more than 30 peer reviewed articles, he has attracted outside funding, he is the director of one of the world’s biggest online courses on diabetes (Diabetes – a Global Challenge), he is a Global Clinical Scholar alumni at the Harvard Medical School and he has been awarded the European Molecular Biology (EMBO) Fellowship Award and now also Lundbeckfonden’s Talent Prize.

“I believe that the Talent Prize will help me continue my research, even if I’ll have to work as a hospital doctor soon. In my view, the prize also signifies how important student research is, because without the generous opportunities afforded me by grants from the Danish Councils for Independent Research, I would never have been able to experience the things that I now have,“ Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen concludes.