Put your life on the line – University of Copenhagen

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Health > News > News 2016 > Put your life on the line

12 April 2016

Put your life on the line

Healthy ageing

Danes grow increasingly old and many different factors influence how we age. Center for Healthy Ageing and Medicinsk Museion at the University of Copenhagen have developed the ageing game, “Life on the Line”, which includes the elements that make us grow old. The game is based on the very latest research, and from the end of March, all visitors at Medicinsk Museion will be able to play along.

Video in Danish
   
Ageing is a complex and at times a both serious and tabooed subject.  How to communicate the complex processes that take place from cells to society as we age? Center for Healthy Ageing and Medicinsk Museion at the University of Copenhagen experiment with this task by way of an ageing game called Life on the Line, where research is communicated in an enlightening as well as entertaining manner.

Research results at play

Foto: Mikal Schlosser

The game is based on research results and professional knowledge on ageing processes from the Center for Healthy Ageing as well as patient and stakeholder organisations, including associations for people with impaired hearing (Høreforeningen), rheumatism/arthritis (Gigtforeningen), cancer (the Danish Cancer Society) and psychological issues (Psykiatrifonden). The Center for Healthy Ageing and the game are funded by Nordea-fonden.

“Throughout the game, we communicate research and knowledge on ageing in a light and informal manner. We know that our ageing is influenced by many different factors, from accommodation, pension, muscle strength to changes in the energy factories in our cells, which is also why we touch on all aspects in the game,” Communications Officer Anne Bernth Jensen from the Center for Healthy Ageing, explains. She has been the main driver behind the development of the game.

Helped by the game’s roulette, players draw a body with both flaws and diseases. They will, however, also include good habits and influences that help increase the body’s life duration.

Life on the Line at the museum

From the end of March, all visitors at Medicinsk Museion in Bredgade, Copenhagen, will be able to play the game Life on the Line. Research is presented by way of gaming pieces and cards and the game reveals the many elements included in ageing. In the game, individual lifestyle choices and flaws are converted into life years. The winner of the game is the person who manages to stay alive the longest.

“We hope that the game will make museum visitors smile while also providing them with food for thought and instigating discussions on ageing. Naturally, transforming individual lifestyle choices into life years, as we do in the game, is not actually possible. However, the game does provide an insight into how diseases, lifestyle choices and coincidences all influence the way our body ages,” Anne Bernth Jensen concludes.

The target group of the game is everyone from the age of 15.

Contact:
Communications Officer Anne Bernth Jensen
Center for Healthy Ageing and Medicinsk Museion
Mobile phone: +45 9356 5161
Email: anje@sund.ku.dk